Posts tagged "Anxiety"

Reduce Stress and Anxiety With Kava Herb

Reduce Stress and Anxiety With Kava Herb

Kava is an ancient crop of the western Pacific. The word kava refers to both the plant and the beverage that is produced from its roots. Kava is a tranquilizer that is primarily consumed to relax the body without disrupting mental clarity. The active ingredients found in this herb kavalactones. Kava extract is marketed as an herbal medicine in some parts of the Western world, fighting against stress, insomnia, and anxiety. It has been concluded that this herb is more effective than a placebo at treating short-term social anxiety. Safety concerns have been raised over liver toxicity, but research indicates that this may be largely due to use of stems and leaves in supplements, which were not indigenously used.

Kava is used by many island communities in the Pacific in their ceremonial drinks as a mild sedative and relaxant. Among these include Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia. This herb was used to relax the body and mind and to promote restful sleep. Kava is considered to be an important herb for pain relief. It is also helpful for insomnia and nervous conditions.

This herb is recommended to be used as a strong muscle relaxant. It is considered to be one of the most powerful of all of the herbal muscle relaxants. Kava is used as an analgesic sedative, for rheumatism, for insomnia, and to relax the body.

Studies have determined that kava contains anticonvulsant and muscle-relaxing properties. This may be extremely helpful to those people who have stress-related muscle tension or seizures. Those individuals who drink kava often relate the effects to a sense of tranquility and sociability. The herb helps to achieve a feeling of well-being and relaxation. Kava seems to have an advantage over other drugs that are prescribed for anxiety and insomnia because it does not seem to lose effectiveness over time. A variety of studies have shown that there is a significant benefit for individuals who are suffering from anxiety. This is extremely promising for those individuals who require long-term therapy for anxiety disorders. Kava is not addictive and is free of associated complications. This is different from many of the medications that are routinely prescribed.

Kava also provides benefits as an analgesic for pain relief. The chewed leaves of this herb cause numbness in the mouth. This anesthetic activity is similar to cocaine and it lasts longer than benzocaine.

The root of the kava plant is used to provide alterative, analgesic, anesthetic, antifungal, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, and sedative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium and magnesium. Primarily, kava is extremely beneficial in dealing with insomnia and nervousness.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating anxiety, asthma, bronchitis, fatigue, pain, rheumatism, uterine infections, vaginitis, and venereal diseases. It is important to consult your health care provider before taking this herb so that you do not have any adverse reactions to medication which is associated with this herb. In order to obtain more information on the many beneficial effects provided by kava, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

More information on kava kava is available at VitaNet ®, LLC Health Food Store. http://vitanetonline.com/

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Posted by Herbs For Me - October 9, 2011 at 11:31 pm

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Did You Treat Your Anxiety Today?

Did You Treat Your Anxiety Today?

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem, and include panic disorders, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Anxiety disorders develop due to an interplay between enviromnental and genetic factors. Cognitive behavior therapy is useful for this disorder, as well as prescription anxiolytic drugs.

However, many patients prefer a natural approach or dislike the side effects of prescription drugs, and there are many non-prescription supplements available to help anxiety. Before starting natural supplements for an anxiety problem, be sure to mention your concerns and get a general checkup from your doctor. Symptoms resembling anxiety and anxiety attacks can be caused by physical diseases such as hormone imbalance, hyperthyroidism or cardiac arrhythmias.

However, if you are sure your problem is an anxiety disorder, the following supplements may be of help, and often have fewer side effects than commercial pharmaceutical products.

Chamomile tea is one of the best-known natural remedies for anxiety. Its affects the digestive tract and the nervous system, thus it is helpful for people who suffer from gastro-intestinal symptoms such as cramps along with mental anxiety. It is recommended that patients drink fresh tea made with chamomile leaves, 1/2 to 1 teaspoon per cup of water, several times a day. It is also available in tinctures which can be added to water. Chamomile capsules are convenient to take along to work, and don’t take as long to brew as the tea. The usual dose is 250 to 500 mg 3 to 4 times daily.

Damiana (Turnera diffusa) is a nerve tonic which also has a restorative (adaptogenic) property. It has a calming effect in cases of mild depression and anxiety, and is also reputed to be an aphrodisiac. Damiana contains flavonoids that act on benzodiazepine and GABA receptors. It exhibits anxiolytic activity, muscle relaxation and sedation. Use 2-4 g of dried leaves infused in a cup of boiling water; 2-3 cups are taken daily. Alternatively, 2-4 ml of a liquid extract or 3-4 grams of powdered leaf in tablets or capsules taken twice daily can be substituted if desired.

Damiana has demonstrated mild hypoglycemic effects in animal studies. Patients with diabetes and hypoglycemia should use this plant with caution, and monitor blood sugar levels closely. Damiana has a traditional use as an abortive and is contraindicated during pregnancy.

Kava Kava (Piper methysticum) has a very quick calming effect on the nervous system and causes an uplifting, euphoric feeling. It is also a muscle relaxant and mild sedative. It is helps anxiety, tension, stress, irritability and insomnia. Kava stops the mind from racing, often a symptom of generalized anxiety disorder.

The usual dose is 750 mg twice daily. Do not exceed 4 capsules per day.

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Kava Kava is a traditional Polynesian remedy, and while it has been used safely by Polynesians for centuries, now that it has become popular worldwide it has been linked to some cases of liver failure in people of other ethnic groups who have difficulty metabolizing it. Ask a health care professional before use if you have a history of liver problems, frequently use alcoholic beverages, or are taking any medication. Stop and see a doctor if you develop symptoms that may signal liver problems (e.g., unexplained fatigue, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, fever, vomiting, dark urine, pale stools, yellow eyes or skin).

Do not use kava kava if less than 18 years of age, or if pregnant/breastfeeding. Do not combine with alcoholic beverages, or prescription anxiolytics or antidepressants . Excessive use, or use with products that cause drowsiness, may impair your ability to operate a vehicle or heavy equipment. Do not take Kava Kava on a daily basis for more than four weeks without consulting a health care provider. Take frequent breaks from use.

Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) is most often used for insomnia, but it can also be taken in the daytime to reduce the effects of stress and anxiety. This herb is often included in European formulas for heart palpitations, which often have anxiety as a component. It is taken in capsule form, 500 mg daily, or 20-30 drops of tincture, or as a fresh tea. Passionflower, though it helps bring on natural sleep, does not have the sedative effects of many prescription sleeping pills.

Pulsatilla is a homeopathic remedy said to be most suitable for shy, hypersensitive people who tend to feel warm rather than cold. Homeopathic practitioners recommend a 30C potency 2-4 times daily for relief of acute symptoms, and 30C or 6C 1-2 times daily for chronic use. Homeopathic remedies use miniscule concentrations of compounds to “nudge” the body into healing itself. They either help or they do not; there are no toxic side effects.

Scullcup (Scutellaria lateriflora) is a relaxing and gentle sedative for the central nervous system. It is very good for nervous tension and for nervous exhaustion plus neurological and neuromotor problems. The dose is 10-20 drops of fresh plant tincture or 1-2 dropperfuls of dried plant tincture. Skullcap can also be sleep inducing, but it is rarely habituating.

St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used for depression, but helps anxiety as well. Use a 300 mg extract 3 times daily. Quality varies widely between brands; it is best to buy a product standardized to contain 3-5% hyperforin and 0.3% hypericin. It works by increasing the level of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system such as serotonin and dopamine. Do not use this product if also taking prescription antidepressants.

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) has been used since Greek and Roman times to promote sleep and relaxation. It can treat insomnia, anxiety, and stress related gastrointestinal upset. According to one theory, valerian affects the brain in a way similar to valium; while another theory holds that valerian contains GABA, a neurotransmitter which has a calming affect on the brain, or else influences the brain’s natural production of GABA. Also, some reasearchers believe that valerian affects serotonin levels in a manner similar to anitdepressant drugs such as Prozac.

If using valerian to treat insomnia, take the herb 30 to 60 minutes before going to bed. It can be taken 2-4 times daily to help stress and anxiety. The recommended dose of tincture is 30-60 drops, or a capsule or tablet of 300-500 mg.

Some people feel groggy after taking valerian; if this occurs, lower the dose. Avoid hazardous activities while using valerian, and do not combine it with other sedatives, antidepressants or alcohol. Do not take valerian for more than 3 weeks, as it can be habituating.

Verbena (Verbena officinalis) is a relaxing nervous system tonic indicated for a wide range of nervous disorders including nervous exhaustion and stress. As a tincture, use 2-4 mls up to 4 times daily. Avoid use during pregnancy as this herb is a uterine stimulant.

Withania (Withania somnifera) is an ayurvedic herb sold under the name Ashwaghanda. It is a very good tonic herb that is especially helpful for debility and nervous exhaustion due to stress. It has steriodal, adaptogenic, sedative and anti-inflammatory properties. It is also useful for panic attacks and phobic disorders such as agoraphobia. Use 1 tsp powder 3 times daily.

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Posted by Herbs For Me - September 10, 2011 at 5:00 am

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Natural Remedies for Depression and Anxiety

Natural Remedies for Depression and Anxiety

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem, and include panic disorders, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Anxiety disorders develop due to an interplay between enviromnental and genetic factors. Cognitive behavior therapy is useful for this disorder, as well as prescription anxiolytic drugs.

However, many patients prefer a natural approach or dislike the side effects of prescription drugs, and there are many non-prescription supplements available to help anxiety. Before starting natural supplements for an anxiety problem, be sure to mention your concerns and get a general checkup from your doctor. Symptoms resembling anxiety and anxiety attacks can be caused by physical diseases such as hormone imbalance, hyperthyroidism or cardiac arrhythmias.

However, if you are sure your problem is an anxiety disorder, the following supplements may be of help, and often have fewer side effects than commercial pharmaceutical products.

Chamomile tea is one of the best-known natural remedies for anxiety. Its affects the digestive tract and the nervous system, thus it is helpful for people who suffer from gastro-intestinal symptoms such as cramps along with mental anxiety. It is recommended that patients drink fresh tea made with chamomile leaves, 1/2 to 1 teaspoon per cup of water, several times a day. It is also available in tinctures which can be added to water. Chamomile capsules are convenient to take along to work, and don’t take as long to brew as the tea. The usual dose is 250 to 500 mg 3 to 4 times daily.

Damiana (Turnera diffusa) is a nerve tonic which also has a restorative (adaptogenic) property. It has a calming effect in cases of mild depression and anxiety, and is also reputed to be an aphrodisiac. Damiana contains flavonoids that act on benzodiazepine and GABA receptors. It exhibits anxiolytic activity, muscle relaxation and sedation. Use 2-4 g of dried leaves infused in a cup of boiling water; 2-3 cups are taken daily. Alternatively, 2-4 ml of a liquid extract or 3-4 grams of powdered leaf in tablets or capsules taken twice daily can be substituted if desired.

Damiana has demonstrated mild hypoglycemic effects in animal studies. Patients with diabetes and hypoglycemia should use this plant with caution, and monitor blood sugar levels closely. Damiana has a traditional use as an abortive and is contraindicated during pregnancy.

Kava Kava (Piper methysticum) has a very quick calming effect on the nervous system and causes an uplifting, euphoric feeling. It is also a muscle relaxant and mild sedative. It is helps anxiety, tension, stress, irritability and insomnia. Kava stops the mind from racing, often a symptom of generalized anxiety disorder.

]]>

The usual dose is 750 mg twice daily. Do not exceed 4 capsules per day.

Kava Kava is a traditional Polynesian remedy, and while it has been used safely by Polynesians for centuries, now that it has become popular worldwide it has been linked to some cases of liver failure in people of other ethnic groups who have difficulty metabolizing it. Ask a health care professional before use if you have a history of liver problems, frequently use alcoholic beverages, or are taking any medication. Stop and see a doctor if you develop symptoms that may signal liver problems (e.g., unexplained fatigue, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, fever, vomiting, dark urine, pale stools, yellow eyes or skin).

Do not use kava kava if less than 18 years of age, or if pregnant/breastfeeding. Do not combine with alcoholic beverages, or prescription anxiolytics or antidepressants . Excessive use, or use with products that cause drowsiness, may impair your ability to operate a vehicle or heavy equipment. Do not take Kava Kava on a daily basis for more than four weeks without consulting a health care provider. Take frequent breaks from use.

Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) is most often used for insomnia, but it can also be taken in the daytime to reduce the effects of stress and anxiety. This herb is often included in European formulas for heart palpitations, which often have anxiety as a component. It is taken in capsule form, 500 mg daily, or 20-30 drops of tincture, or as a fresh tea. Passionflower, though it helps bring on natural sleep, does not have the sedative effects of many prescription sleeping pills.

Pulsatilla is a homeopathic remedy said to be most suitable for shy, hypersensitive people who tend to feel warm rather than cold. Homeopathic practitioners recommend a 30C potency 2-4 times daily for relief of acute symptoms, and 30C or 6C 1-2 times daily for chronic use. Homeopathic remedies use miniscule concentrations of compounds to “nudge” the body into healing itself. They either help or they do not; there are no toxic side effects.

Scullcup (Scutellaria lateriflora) is a relaxing and gentle sedative for the central nervous system. It is very good for nervous tension and for nervous exhaustion plus neurological and neuromotor problems. The dose is 10-20 drops of fresh plant tincture or 1-2 dropperfuls of dried plant tincture. Skullcap can also be sleep inducing, but it is rarely habituating.

St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used for depression, but helps anxiety as well. Use a 300 mg extract 3 times daily. Quality varies widely between brands; it is best to buy a product standardized to contain 3-5% hyperforin and 0.3% hypericin. It works by increasing the level of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system such as serotonin and dopamine. Do not use this product if also taking prescription antidepressants.

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) has been used since Greek and Roman times to promote sleep and relaxation. It can treat insomnia, anxiety, and stress related gastrointestinal upset. According to one theory, valerian affects the brain in a way similar to valium; while another theory holds that valerian contains GABA, a neurotransmitter which has a calming affect on the brain, or else influences the brain’s natural production of GABA. Also, some reasearchers believe that valerian affects serotonin levels in a manner similar to anitdepressant drugs such as Prozac.

If using valerian to treat insomnia, take the herb 30 to 60 minutes before going to bed. It can be taken 2-4 times daily to help stress and anxiety. The recommended dose of tincture is 30-60 drops, or a capsule or tablet of 300-500 mg.

Some people feel groggy after taking valerian; if this occurs, lower the dose. Avoid hazardous activities while using valerian, and do not combine it with other sedatives, antidepressants or alcohol. Do not take valerian for more than 3 weeks, as it can be habituating.

Verbena (Verbena officinalis) is a relaxing nervous system tonic indicated for a wide range of nervous disorders including nervous exhaustion and stress. As a tincture, use 2-4 mls up to 4 times daily. Avoid use during pregnancy as this herb is a uterine stimulant.

Withania (Withania somnifera) is an ayurvedic herb sold under the name Ashwaghanda. It is a very good tonic herb that is especially helpful for debility and nervous exhaustion due to stress. It has steriodal, adaptogenic, sedative and anti-inflammatory properties. It is also useful for panic attacks and phobic disorders such as agoraphobia. Use 1 tsp powder 3 times daily.

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Posted by Herbs For Me - September 7, 2011 at 5:00 am

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Overcome Your Fear and Anxiety About How to Get Rid of Acne Naturally

Overcome Your Fear and Anxiety About How to Get Rid of Acne Naturally

Almost everyone suffers from generalized skin disease called “hunter”. Acne is mainly caused due to blockage of the follicle-ducts of the sebaceous glands of the skin. This later lead to infection and inflammation from P. Acne’s bacteria. There are several home remedies that are experienced by many for 100 years. Some herbal cure for acne is listed here. It helps acne and acts as a medium house off. The drugs are:
The easiest cure is drinking water. Sunglasses to drink seven to eight water per day, as he helps clean out toxins that are present in your blood. The best way to remove toxins from the water. Excess water consumption can provide a better appearance.
The most popular drug is effective if you’re wondering how to get rid of acne naturally is to drink water, herbal, prepared by boiling a glass of water with a single hair of wheat and two seeds of fenugreek. It also applies to the Bengal gram flour and curd, which is one of the remedies proposed by senior experts when asked about how to eliminate acne naturally.
Cucumber juice, or add the carrot juice, lettuce is considered one of the best acne remedies at home that can be done. To cure cystic acne, just apricot juice on the affected area.
Apply a paste of fenugreek leaves acne one night to see results next morning. They serve as a factor in the prevention of drug herbs for acne, which helps maintain a healthy skin. You can use Acuzine as a dietary supplement to eliminate acne.
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Are you one among the acne sufferers? Need a remedy to bring back the glow on your face? Click here to know more about how to get rid of acne naturally

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Posted by Herbs For Me - August 17, 2011 at 5:00 am

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